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IJERPH, Vol. 16, Pages 3953: Lived Experiences of Suicide Risk and Resilience among Alaska Native and American Indian People

17 Oct 2019

IJERPH, Vol. 16, Pages 3953: Lived Experiences of Suicide Risk and Resilience among Alaska Native and American Indian People

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health doi: 10.3390/ijerph16203953

Authors:
Jennifer L. Shaw
Julie A. Beans
Katherine Anne Comtois
Vanessa Y. Hiratsuka

This study explored the lived experiences of suicidality and help-seeking for suicide prevention among Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI) people in a tribal health system. An interpretive phenomenological approach was used to analyze semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 15 individuals (ages 15–56) with self-reported histories of suicide ideation and/or attempt. Several factors were found to be central to acquiring resilience to suicide risk among AN/AI people across a wide age range: meaningful and consistent social connection, awareness about how one’s suicide would negatively effect loved ones, and knowledge and utilization of available health services. Findings highlight the mutable nature of suicide risk and resilience, as well as the importance of interpersonal factors in suicidality.

Click here to view the full article which appeared in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health