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IJERPH, Vol. 16, Pages 2560: The Role of Eicosanoids in Alzheimer’s Disease

18 Jul 2019

IJERPH, Vol. 16, Pages 2560: The Role of Eicosanoids in Alzheimer’s Disease

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health doi: 10.3390/ijerph16142560

Authors:
Roger G. Biringer

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders known. Estimates from the Alzheimer’s Association suggest that there are currently 5.8 million Americans living with the disease and that this will rise to 14 million by 2050. Research over the decades has revealed that AD pathology is complex and involves a number of cellular processes. In addition to the well-studied amyloid-β and tau pathology, oxidative damage to lipids and inflammation are also intimately involved. One aspect all these processes share is eicosanoid signaling. Eicosanoids are derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids by enzymatic or non-enzymatic means and serve as short-lived autocrine or paracrine agents. Some of these eicosanoids serve to exacerbate AD pathology while others serve to remediate AD pathology. A thorough understanding of eicosanoid signaling is paramount for understanding the underlying mechanisms and developing potential treatments for AD. In this review, eicosanoid metabolism is examined in terms of in vivo production, sites of production, receptor signaling, non-AD biological functions, and known participation in AD pathology.

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